Tag Archives: safety

Happy 2010 From The Baby Bodyguard's Family!

I hope all of you had a wonderful and safe holiday season with your families. We at Baby Bodyguards wanted to take this opportunity to thank each and every one of you for your continued support and shared passion for protecting the little ones in our lives.

We are thankful for all the wonderful families and adorable babies we have gotten to meet in 2009. We are also thankful and anxiously awaiting the arrival of our first baby girl due the end of April.

May 2010 bring all of us joy, good health , and success…

Cheers,

Courtney Ilarraza, and the rest of our team

More Parents Are Using Second-Hand Baby Items, How Safe is This?

It’s no surprise that in today’s down economy, more parents are looking to purchase second-hand items for baby, or take hand-me-downs from friends and relatives. The problem is that some second-hand items may be putting your baby at risk.

Recently Toys “R” Us, Inc launched a national program to spotlight potentially unsafe baby products still in the marketplace. It was called the “Great Trade-in Event” to encourage parents to trade in older baby items, in exchange for a discount on new items. The company realizes that due to safety concerns, certain used items such as car seats and cribs, are not good candidates to be passed down or resold.

According to the consumer advocacy group, Kids in Danger (KID), less than 30% of affected items are returned when a baby product is recalled. Recalls as well as other issues such as not knowing the history of a product such as a car seat, or not spotting damage to an item can cause serious injury and even death.

Baby Bodyguards urges parents  not to buy second-hand items such as car seats, cribs, play yards and bassinets because these items in particular have a history of safety problems.

If you are going to purchase an item second-hand, there are certain precautions that should be taken, such as looking at www.cpsc.gov, to make sure the product has not been recalled. Also, check a used baby product  by looking for damage and broken or missing parts. If you find anything wrong, do not purchase that specific item as it may not be safe. A broken or missing part will not be easy to fix and still provide the safety that baby needs

Car Seats Can Lower Oxygen Levels In Blood While Baby Sleeps

I remember the days of my Snap and Go and Snug Ride. I loved having my baby fall asleep during a car ride, or a walk, and then just unhook the car seat and put it on my living room floor, while the baby slept and I took care of some bills or email. Unfortunately, those days are gone after a new study came out in the journal Pediatrics.

The study found that the seats can compress the chest wall and reduce airway size, which can result in lower oxygen levels in the blood. The study found that car seats can result in mild respiratory compromise in abut 20% of newborns.

While these seats are a must for travel, it is important for us to ever so carefully lift our babies out of their car seats and put them in their cribs.

Click for more info on the study

After Two Tragedies This Week, Lets Talk Window Guards

In the last two days, two toddlers have fallen out of windows in Brooklyn, New York. No word yet on the condition of the two children. These falls are tragic and they could have been prevented with proper window safety

In September of 2008, we wrote a column for A Child Grows in Brooklyn, outlining NYC’s window guard law.

Health Code Section 131.15: (NYC’s window guards law)
-Pertains only to owners of a building containing 3 or more apartments.
-These owners, must provide and properly install approved window guards on all windows.
-All windows also includes, first floor bathroom, windows leading onto a balcony or terrace and in each hallway window, if any, in such buildings.
-This applies in apartments where a child (or children) 10 years of age or younger reside .
Exceptions to this law:
– Windows that open onto fire escapes
– A window on the first floor that is a required secondary exit in a building in which there are fire escapes on the second floor and up.
NYC Approved Window Guards, What are they?
-Approved window guards are a minimum of 15 inches tall with horizontal bars spaced so that any round object which is 5 inches or bigger cannot pass through
-The Manufacturer’s approval number must be imprinted on a vertical stile of the guard. For example: HDWG # 07-94-65. The number must be listed on the Approved List of Manufacturers and Model Numbers, distributed by the Department of Health.
-Guards must be appropriate for the type of window in which they are installed: double hung, casement, slider, etc.
-A landlord or manager must produce a supporting letter from the Window Guard Policy and Acceptance Board if a variance is claimed as having been granted.
-NYC approved window guards, are not permitted to be removed and are nearly impossible to remove once they are installed.
Most of the questions Baby Bodyguards receives about window guards are from parents wanting to protect their children from window accidents in their co-op, condo or house, where the NYC Window Guard Policy does not apply. In these situations we almost always recommend Guardian Angel Window Guards .
Guardian Angel Window Guards are removable, which is great in case of an emergency, or in order to install an air conditioner in the summer. They are also extremely durable, capable of withstanding 150 pounds of pressure. The Guardian Angel Company is so confident about the quality of their product that they offer a Lifetime Warranty. NYC approved window guards and Guardian Angel guards can be tricky to install depending on what material you are mounting them onto. As with any safety device, either window guard will only work if installed properly.

Bugaboo Recalls Strollers Due to Risk of Brake Failure

NEWS from CPSC

U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission

Office of Information and Public Affairs Washington, DC 20207

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 2, 2009
Release # 09-233
Firm’s Recall Hotline: (800) 460-2922
CPSC Recall Hotline: (800) 638-2772
CPSC Media Contact: (301) 504-7908

 

Bugaboo Recalls Strollers Due to Risk of Brake Failure

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with the firm named below, today announced a voluntary recall of the following consumer product. Consumers should stop using recalled products immediately unless otherwise instructed.

Name of Product: Bugaboo Bee Strollers

Units: About 22,500

Distributor: Bugaboo North America Inc., of Hermosa Beach, Calif.

Manufacturer: Bugaboo Design & Sales, B.V., of the Netherlands

Hazard: One or both sides of the brakes can fail, causing a stroller to unexpectedly roll away on an incline. This can pose a risk of injury to the child occupant.

Incidents/Injuries: Bugaboo has received 121 reports of the stroller’s brakes failing. No injuries have been reported.

Description: Bugaboo Bee strollers have item code 580210 on a label on the back of the seat and item code 50100 on a label on the plastic support under the seat. The strollers were sold in blue, dark khaki, pink, red, yellow, and black. “bugaboo® bee” is printed on the left side of the seat.

Sold at: Juvenile product retailers nationwide and on various Web sites from August 2007 through April 2009 for about $530.

Manufactured in: Taiwan

Remedy: Consumers should stop using the strollers immediately and contact Bugaboo to receive a free repair kit. To order the bracket kit, go to www.bugaboo.com and fill in the special order form or contact Bugaboo customer service.

Consumer Contact: For additional information, contact Bugaboo at (800) 460-2922 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. PT Monday through Friday, visit the firm’s Web site at www.bugaboo.com, or email the firm at bugaboobee-service@bugaboo.com

Picture of Recalled Stroller

2009 Safer Sunscreen List

Most of you already know that I am a HUGE fan of Safe Mama (safemama.com), The SafeMama reviews tons of shampoos, bug sprays, sunblocks etc, and compile lists of the best of the best using very strict criteria.

It’s that time of year again, and all of us mamas need to add the sunblock to out diaper bags for daily use. I wanted to share the 2009 SafeMama’s Sunscreen Showdown.

My diaper bag is stocked with JASON Cosmetics Chemical Free Sunblock. I not only use this for my son, but for myself too, and have been very happy with it the last 2 years.   It can be found in health food stores for $14.

Solution to Tap Water Scalding

A few weeks ago I learned that a child I know suffered 2nd degree burns when her nanny turned her back for a second and the child turned the bath faucet on, scolding her arm. We always recommend that the water temperature in a house NOT be above 120 degrees.

The problem arises when parents live in a building, where they don’t have control over the water temperature. Baby Bodyguards now has the solution! We came across HotStop Anti-Scalding products. These products are designed to stop water flow if the water temperature reaches a dangerous level.

The HotStop line of products features tub spouts (with and without diverter), shower heads and a hand showers. All four products have the HotStop scald protection built into the fixture.

I installed HotStop in my own shower to try out. I happen to like hot showers and was concerned that I wouldn’t be able to enjoy my shower, but I did. The HotStop didn’t interfere with the temperature I prefer. I then tested to make sure that it worked. I ran the water, and as soon as the water got a wee bit hotter than I enjoy, it shut off, and resumed running once the water cooled down.

If you have any questions or are interested in HotStop, contact us

Recall on Britax Frontier

Some car seats are being recalled after safety experts determined they could fail to secure children in the event of a crash.

Cerain Britax Frontier child restraints are involved.

Tests reveal the harness straps may detach from the metal yoke on the back of the restraint if repeatedly loosened one strap at a time.

To fix the problem, Britax will mail to all registered owners rubber caps that prevent the straps from detaching.

To get the fix, call Britax at 800-683-2045 and request a kit.

You can also order a fix on their Web site.

The affected models include E9L54E7, E9L54H6, E9L54H7, E9L54M6 manufactured on or before September 14, 2008, and model E9L5490 manufactured on or before Sept. 17, 2008.

Use Caution When Giving Kids Cold and Flu Meds

 ANN ARBOR, Mich., Jan. 5 It’s cold and flu season, which means misery for kids and the parents trying to help them. But doctors are asking parents to resist the urge to give children under the age of 6 over-the-counter cough and cold medication. Such drugs can have serious side effects on the smallest of children, the Food and Drug Administration warns. Side effects include hives, drowsiness, difficulty breathing and even death. “Some 7,000 children end up in the emergency room each year because of problems associated with these medicines,” says Esther Yoon, M.D., general pediatrician in the Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases at the University of Michigan Health System. Roughly two-thirds of incidents occurred after children drank medication while unsupervised, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most problems have occurred as a result of dosing errors. To ease pain from a harsh cough or throat pain, doctors recommend using over-the-counter acetaminophen and ibuprofen in age-appropriate doses, Yoon says.    To relieve symptoms, doctors recommend the following: For blocked noses, parents should use nasal saline drops and a bulb suction to loosen up and remove mucus or have the child blow their nose. For coughs, the child should be given a teaspoon of honey or corn syrup if over the age of 1. Have the child drink warm fluids like water, apple juice and chicken broth to help with coughing. Take the child into the bathroom and run a hot shower. The steam relaxes the airways and helps with coughing spasms. Increase the humidity in the home to help reduce nasal congestion and coughing. Parents can help prevent colds by washing hands frequently, using instant hand sanitizers, teaching children to cover their mouth and nose when they cough or sneeze, and making sure children are well hydrated, have good nutrition and are getting enough sleep. “Other good tips include disinfecting the home, kitchen countertops, door knobs and toys,” Yoon says. “Children should get plenty of vitamin C and E to help fight germs and a multivitamin is also helpful.” Cold symptoms caused by a virus typically last between four and five days. But if they continue for more than five days, Yoon recommends taking the child to a doctor. If a child is having difficulty breathing or is wheezing, he or she should be seen right away. Infants younger than 3 months old with a fever should also be seen right away. For more information, visit these Web sites: FDA recommendation: http://www.fda.gov/Cder/drug/advisory/cough_cold_2008.htm What to do for colds and flu: http://www.fda.gov/opacom/lowlit/clds&flu.html SOURCE  University of Michigan Health System

The Nitty Gritty About Second Hand Car Seats

Having a baby is expensive, we can all agree on that. Second hand high chairs, toddler beds and clothing come in very handy. The one item that I strongly recommend buying new is a car safety seat. New car seats come with registration cards. As soon as you buy your car seat, be sure to send in the card to register it. Then the manufacturer can let you know by mail if your child’s safety seat has been recalled.

If for some reason you must use a second hand car seat, here are some guidelines to follow:

Avoid used seats if you don’t know the seat’s history. Never use a car seat that

    • Is too old. Look on the label for the date it was made. Check with the manufacturer to find out how long they recommend using the seat.
    • Have any visible cracks on it.
    • Does not have a label with the date of manufacture and model number. Without these, you cannot check to see if the seat has been recalled.
    • Does not come with instructions. You need them to know how to use the seat.
    • Is missing parts. Used car safety seats often come without important parts. Check with the manufacturer to make sure you can get the right parts.
    • Was recalled. You can find out by calling the manufacturer or by contacting the Auto Safety Hotline at 888/DASH-2-DOT (888/327-4236) or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) at www-odi.nhtsa.dot.gov/cars/problems/recalls/childseat.cfm.
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Do not use seats that have been in a moderate or severe crash. Seats that were in a minor crash may still be safe to use. The NHTSA considers a crash minor if all of the following are true:
    • The vehicle could be driven away from the crash.
    • The vehicle door closest to the car safety seat was not damaged.
    • No one in the vehicle was injured.
    • The air bags did not go off.
    • You can’t see any damage to the car safety seat.
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If you cannot verify all of the above, the car seat is considered unsafe for use, even if it appears to be in good condition. Unless a used car seat is coming from a close friend or family member and meets the above criteria, it is almost always safer to choose a new car seat for your baby.